Best Country in the World: Professional Networking Edition


After I wrote my last post about which countries are the best in the world and three of the top five were in Scandinavia, I got curious about what it might take to move there. From my quick research, it seems that in all the Scandinavian countries, if you want to get a job, you need to (a) speak the language (working on it) and (b) know someone, because companies want to hire natives before they want to try and bring someone in from another country (or at least a country outside of Europe). So I was curious who I might know in Scandinavia, and if that could again help me focus on one language to learn instead of three. Of course I don’t know anyone off the top of my head, but I knew a way to find people I know who might themselves know someone: LinkedIn.

LinkedIn allows you to do a fairly precise search for contacts, including location, industry, and how well you know someone (1st, 2nd, or 3rd-level contact, it’s kind of like Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon). So I searched for 2nd-level contacts living in Denmark, Norway and Sweden, and in the fields of architecture and planning, research, government administration, and non-profits.

I got about 99 results, although I could only look at about 70 of them before hitting LinkedIn’s commercial search limit (not cool, LinkedIn). I then mapped them out, marking how well their field of work matches my interests, and how well I know our mutual contact, since I have several people on my LinkedIn that I’ve met once or have only corresponded with via email.Map-01I have four cities with a decent number of contacts: Copenhagen (København), Oslo, Stockholm, and Trondheim. Of those, the most contacts in a related field are in Copenhagen and Stockholm. But the highest quality contacts, those where I actually know our mutual contact well, are in Copenhagen. So maybe, for now, I’ll focus on learning Danish.

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Finding the Best Country in the World


I’m a bit paranoid. Like when I get home, stick my head in the door, look around, and tell my wife, “Yep, no racoons,” I’m only sort of kidding (a racoon did break into my house when I was a kid so that’s not a totally crazy thing to say). One way this paranoia manifests itself is in creating certain contingency plans. For instance, if I had to flee the country where would I go? The easy answer would be the other English-speaking countries (Canada first because it’s close, the UK second because it’s further but I have friends there, New Zealand third because it looked nice in Lord of the Rings and Australia last because I’m sorry but I do not trust your fauna). But what if, say, all the English speaking countries got nuked or something? Or if we find out that global warming only affects them and they get wiped off the face of the earth? Or they all get conquered by North Korea? Well, if that’s the case, it’s time to flee to a non-English speaking country and learn another language. But which one?

At one point I couldn’t decide, and I was studying Danish, Dutch, Irish, Spanish and Swedish on Duolingo all at the same time (yes, I know next to no one speaks Irish, that was just for kicks). Eventually I cut out Irish and Spanish, but also picked up German, so I wasn’t much better off. So I wanted to figure out, if I’m going to have to flee to another country, including non-English speaking countries, which ones should I focus on so that I can actually study their language effectively?

I thought the Human Development Index (HDI) was a good place to start. It measures a country’s well-being based on a combination of several factors, including life expectancy, education and income. Its top five countries are Norway, Australia, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and the United States. However, HDI doesn’t measure everything. In fact, in 2010 they introduced a new index, the Inequality-Adjusted Human Development Index (IHDI) to try and fill in some of the gaps. This new adjustment changes the top five to Norway, Australia, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Germany, and kicked the US down to 28th, three spots below Greece.

My thought was that the best way to cover as many factors as I could was to combine as many different indices as I could to create one super index that would bring in enough factors to create a truly well-rounded indicator of what the best country was. I combined the IHDI, Democracy Index, Human Poverty Index, Social Progress Index, World Happiness Report, Global Peace Index, Legatum Prosperity Index, Where-to-be-born Index, Satisfaction with Life Index, and OECD Better Life Index to create what I call the Best Country Index.

Index Index2

So the top five are Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Denmark, and Finland. Well, right now Norwegian isn’t offered on Duolingo, so even if it’s number one I’m not studying it until they finish creating the course for it, so for now I’ll just have to assume it’s somewhere between Danish and Swedish. And I’m not even going to try with Finnish; I had a hard enough time with Irish, and that’s still an Indo-European language, I can only imagine the sort of trouble I would have learning a Finno-Ugric one. So that leaves me (until Duolingo adds Norwegian) with Swedish, German, and Danish. Well, at least I can stop studying Dutch for now.

For those of you who would like a searchable version of the list above, here it is:

  1. Norway, 2.9877
  2. Sweden, 2.9732
  3. Switzerland, 2.9724
  4. Denmark, 2.9702
  5. Finland, 2.8872
  6. Canada, 2.8858
  7. Netherlands, 2.8778
  8. Australia, 2.8257
  9. New Zealand, 2.7938
  10. Austria, 2.7792
  11. Germany, 2.6754
  12. Ireland, 2.6643
  13. Iceland, 2.6580
  14. Belgium, 2.5993
  15. United Kingdom, 2.4850
  16. United States, 2.4315
  17. France, 2.3879
  18. Japan, 2.3759
  19. Spain, 2.3667
  20. Slovenia, 2.2898
  21. Czech Republic, 2.2789
  22. Italy, 2.2484
  23. Costa Rica, 2.2419
  24. Chile, 2.1414
  25. Luxembourg, 2.1216
  26. South Korea, 2.1083
  27. Singapore, 2.0700
  28. Poland, 2.0554
  29. Slovakia, 2.0191
  30. Portugal, 2.0180
  31. Israel, 2.0131
  32. United Arab Emirates, 1.9953
  33. Argentina, 1.9745
  34. Uruguay, 1.9719
  35. Kuwait, 1.9342
  36. Cyprus, 1.9248
  37. Panama, 1.9047
  38. Estonia, 1.8984
  39. Hungary, 1.8743
  40. Croatia, 1.8356
  41. Malaysia, 1.8159
  42. Taiwan, 1.8096
  43. Malta, 1.8054
  44. Greece, 1.7843
  45. Brazil, 1.7838
  46. Trinidad and Tobago, 1.7417
  47. Mauritius, 1.7076
  48. Hong Kong, 1.7074
  49. Mexico, 1.6853
  50. Latvia, 1.6692
  51. Lithuania, 1.6575
  52. Saudi Arabia, 1.6445
  53. Colombia, 1.5608
  54. Romania, 1.5560
  55. Bulgaria, 1.5293
  56. Mongolia, 1.5285
  57. Jamaica, 1.5272
  58. Venezuela, 1.5111
  59. Serbia, 1.4994
  60. Dominican Republic, 1.4682
  61. Thailand, 1.4682
  62. Qatar, 1.4612
  63. Indonesia, 1.4586
  64. Ecuador, 1.3933
  65. Montenegro, 1.3921
  66. Paraguay, 1.3908
  67. Botswana, 1.3800
  68. Peru, 1.3728
  69. El Salvador, 1.3698
  70. Brunei, 1.3360
  71. Bhutan, 1.3356
  72. Philippines, 1.3135
  73. Bahamas, 1.2969
  74. Suriname, 1.2959
  75. Nicaragua, 1.2713
  76. Guatemala, 1.2650
  77. Sri Lanka, 1.2616
  78. Albania, 1.2463
  79. Vietnam, 1.2340
  80. Macedonia, 1.2286
  81. Cuba, 1.2284
  82. Guyana, 1.2281
  83. Bolivia, 1.2224
  84. Namibia, 1.2217
  85. Kazakhstan, 1.2140
  86. Tunisia, 1.2068
  87. Bosnia and Herzegovina, 1.1818
  88. Oman, 1.1790
  89. Turkey, 1.1783
  90. South Africa, 1.1738
  91. Antigua and Barbuda, 1.1625
  92. Belarus, 1.1555
  93. Jordan, 1.1534
  94. East Timor, 1.1433
  95. Moldova, 1.1385
  96. Seychelles, 1.1310
  97. St. Kitts and Nevis, 1.1231
  98. Honduras, 1.1190
  99. Ghana, 1.1158
  100. Liechtenstein, 1.1140
  101. Uzbekistan, 1.0997
  102. Vanuatu, 1.0995
  103. Barbados, 1.0759
  104. Kyrgyzstan, 1.0725
  105. Dominica, 1.0601
  106. Morocco, 1.0518
  107. Belize, 1.0164
  108. Fiji, 1.0143
  109. Ukraine, 1.0137
  110. China, 1.0126
  111. Georgia, 1.0109
  112. Bahrain, 0.9991
  113. Cape Verde, 0.9768
  114. St. Vincent and the Grenadines, 0.9734
  115. Russia, 0.9629
  116. Andorra, 0.9617
  117. India, 0.9617
  118. Armenia, 0.9466
  119. Bangladesh, 0.9446
  120. Zambia, 0.9422
  121. Senegal, 0.9332
  122. Azerbaijan, 0.9238
  123. St. Lucia, 0.9183
  124. Lebanon, 0.8938
  125. Gabon, 0.8898
  126. Nepal, 0.8886
  127. Samoa, 0.8789
  128. Papua New Guinea, 0.8788
  129. Tanzania, 0.8685
  130. Algeria, 0.8633
  131. Cambodia, 0.8305
  132. Maldives, 0.8239
  133. Lesotho, 0.8086
  134. Iran, 0.8053
  135. Laos, 0.7953
  136. Madagascar, 0.7853
  137. Kenya, 0.7636
  138. Benin, 0.7603
  139. Tajikistan, 0.7579
  140. Solomon Islands, 0.7452
  141. Tonga, 0.7371
  142. Sao Tome and Principe, 0.7316
  143. Grenada, 0.7213
  144. Egypt, 0.7050
  145. Palestine, 0.6883
  146. Malawi, 0.6800
  147. Mozambique, 0.6666
  148. Burkina Faso, 0.6468
  149. Congo, 0.6432
  150. Uganda, 0.6267
  151. Mali, 0.6129
  152. Angola, 0.6028
  153. Liberia, 0.5733
  154. Sierra Leone, 0.5716
  155. Libya, 0.5652
  156. Cameroon, 0.5604
  157. Haiti, 0.5543
  158. Gambia, 0.5511
  159. Djibouti, 0.5483
  160. Mauritania, 0.5472
  161. Nigeria, 0.5384
  162. Togo, 0.5369
  163. Swaziland, 0.5051
  164. Pakistan, 0.5007
  165. Rwanda, 0.4921
  166. Comoros, 0.4904
  167. Iraq, 0.4849
  168. Yemen, 0.4505
  169. Kiribati, 0.4407
  170. Turkmenistan, 0.4333
  171. Niger, 0.4307
  172. Syria, 0.4233
  173. Guinea, 0.3683
  174. Ethiopia, 0.3662
  175. Equatorial Guinea, 0.3662
  176. Cote d’Ivoire, 0.3357
  177. Burma, 0.3104
  178. Zimbabwe, 0.2542
  179. Burundi, 0.2502
  180. Guinea-Bissau, 0.2489
  181. Eritrea, 0.1878
  182. Afghanistan, 0.1861
  183. Central African Republic, 0.1709
  184. Chad, 0.1657
  185. Sudan, 0.1458
  186. Democratic Republic of the Congo, 0.0675
  187. Somalia, 0.0205
  188. North Korea, 0.0169

Where are you from?


This is one of the first things someone asks when you meet new people, and for me, it’s always been sort of hard to answer. For instance, if I’m traveling, I’ll usually say Philadelphia, since that’s where I live, but it’s not where I grew up and I don’t identify strongly with the city. Usually I either tell people I’m from Pittsburgh, where my parents currently live and where I graduated from high school, or that I grew up in Pittsburgh and western Massachusetts, since I spent six years of my childhood in each place. I usually gloss over the fact that I have also lived in California, Utah, Idaho, and Oregon, because I didn’t live in those places as long and they didn’t have as much of an impact on me, but they are still part of the equation.

But what if I go further back, and think more broadly? I was born in the Bay Area, so sometimes I say I’m a native Californian (this is mostly when I’m comparing myself to my wife, who lived her whole life in California except for her first two weeks, when her family lived in Spokane, so she isn’t a native Californian, like I am). My parents grew up California and Nevada, and their parents in California, Washington, Nevada, and Utah, so I could say I’m from the West or the West Coast. But how did my family get to the West Coast?

This, combined with an on-again-off-again interest in genealogy, led me to map the last ten generations of my family.

Click to enlarge.

My family came to America in two large groups, what I could call Mormon and pre-Mormon. My Mormon ancestors converted to the church in their home countries of England, Denmark, and Norway, and then emigrated to Utah, some of them later spilling out into California. The pre-Mormons came from England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Denmark, and Germany, and settled up and down to east coast of the US and Canada, some of them later converting to Mormonism and heading to Utah, with others coming west for new employment, such as mining and ship building.

So that’s the larger, geographic explanation of where I’m from: mostly Scandinavia and the British Isles, where my ancestors came from seeking economic opportunity and religious freedom, eventually settling in the western United States, where I was born and from whence I returned to the East Coast. But geography isn’t the only part of where a person is from; geographically, I’ve lived all over the US, but I consider myself a Pittsburgher because I love the Steelers and Polish food, and a New Englander because of my left leaning politics and the fact that my family has, in the past, made our own maple syrup. So what were the places where my ancestors lived like? I decided to leave out the places where my ancestors moved to or from (the lines on the above map), and focus on the places where they lived for at least one generation (the circles).

Click to enlarge.

Originally I thought that I would spotlight each of the places, but excluding counties there are 32 of them, and that would get tedious, so I’m going to include an image gallery so you can get an idea of what they look like and identify some trends.

Most of the places my ancestors lived in were small towns, villages and hamlets. Only four (Copenhagen, Glasgow, Baltimore and London) are metropolitan centers, and I would only add Walsall and New Haven to to that to make a list of cities. The rest are too small. This makes sense, considering that it is only fairly recently that our world has had more than half of its people living in cities.

Along with being small, most of the places my ancestors lived were very rural. The graph above divides the places based on my matrix of settlement types, showing that they are mostly rural villages. What I think is interesting though is that there are very few suburban places; only Ballerup and Middletown fit this description. Ballerup is a historical town that has been sucked into Copenhagen’s sphere of influence, and Middletown is on the edge of the New York metropolitan area. I wonder how different they might have been when my ancestors lived there. It’s important to note that the suburb as we experience it today, with separated uses, cul-de-sacs, car dependency, and dependency on a larger nearby city, is very much a modern phenomenon, something our ancestors were unfamiliar with. Note: while some might call Walsall a suburb of Birmingham, it features mixed uses and a connected street grid, which give it a more urban character; I would call it a city that is part of the Birmingham metropolis.

I really enjoyed learning more about my ancestors and the places they lived. Check out the gallery below to see more of what these places look like.

Appologies and Bernts Have Daycare Center


Wow, it has been a long time since I posted.  Grad school is harder than I was expecting, and takes up more of my time than I would have thought.  While my undergrad was easy enough to breeze through and still have plenty of time to update the old blog at least once a month, Penn is considerably more demanding.  Also, I wish at this point that I would have spent more time on my long Christmas break working on the blog, but I mostly spent it loafing about watching Mythbusters back at home in Pittsburgh.  But now I am back in Philadelphia, it is the last day of break before classes, and I have finally taken the initiative to work on the blog again.  Let’s hope I can get at least a few posts in here before Workshop kicks my butt later this semester, as I have been assured it will.

I actually found this building a few months ago, but it has taken me forever to actually write about it, and after this post is done I will finally be able to close those two tabs on my Firefox.  This is Elverhøj, the daycare center and kindergarten at Bernts Have, a neighborhood on the outskirts of Holbæk, Denmark, by Henning Larsen Architects.  It is comprised of the nursery in the southern wing and kindergarten in the northern wing, with administrative offices linking them.  It bursts out of the hilly terrain to the South and West, opening towards a small lake, the rest of the city, and the sun.

There are a lot of things I really like about this building.  It is very well integrated into its landscape, both in how it juts out of the hillside, how its green roof helps it blend in, and how the play areas are landscaped.

The landscaping has a mix of more manicured and more natural areas mixed in with the play spaces and hills to provide a wide variety of play and teaching opportunities for the children.  The landscaping doesn’t end outside the building, but is integrated within it as well.

Corridors in the areas between the south-facing windows and the inner rooms provide both a temperature buffer and added greenery, and are heated in Spring and Fall, providing the kids with a play place that is neither inside nor outside.  The plan shows how the layout of the building provides some sustainable solutions.

keep in mind that the section between the wings runs north-south, so north is not up in the picture above, but slightly up and far to the left (I spent a lot of time picking up my laptop and turning it around to figure that out, and I’m hoping I wasn’t the only person confused by this).  What this does is it allows the two long, narrow wings to get light and heat that they wouldn’t both get if they were right next to each other in a more blockey structure.  In the morning, there is even light in the administrative section.  The playground to the south is very sunny all day and all year round.  In cold climates like Denmark, it is important to use the sun to the greatest extent possible to achieve sustainability and minimize heating and lighting costs.  The green roof also provides greater insulation, while providing space for vegetation.

Another thing that I like about this structure is the fact that there is a railing, which you can see in the image above and at top.  I’m not sure why it doesn’t extend all the way to the edges of the roof, because there’s plenty of play area there and it almost tempts the more adventurous kids to hop the fence.  Maybe there were considerations about noise that were involved, I don’t know.  But it does allow for at least part of the roof to be used as a play area, just as any grassy area on the ground would be used.  The small detail of this railing is something that, at least here at Penn, seems to be left out of architectural designs.  I have seen mid-rise buildings designed with exterior facing entrances with no railings.  If they were to be built, it would be a matter of minutes before balls, pets and children were flying off the higher stories into traffic.  While railings aren’t sexy or artistic, they are sensible, and it is important to find good ways to integrate them.

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